Intervento DCR

Intervento DCR

A Dacryocystorhinostomy, or DCR, is an operation that restores drainage of tears by creating a new drainage channel. DCR surgery may be performed externally from the side of the nose or internally from within the nose. External DCR is the most common type of procedure and has a success rate of over 90%. A small opening is made on the side of the nose to gain access to the tear sac. A small amount of bone between the tear sac and the nose is removed. A new passage is made for the tears to drain out of the eye and flexible tubes are placed in the new passage to keep it open. The tubes are usually removed after 6 to 8 weeks. The stitches on the side of the nose are removed after approximately one week. The Internal or Endoscopic DCR involves using a miniature telescope to look up the nose and locate the site of the blockage, which is then opened up surgically. A flexible tube is inserted to keep the passage open, which again is removed after approximately 6 to 8 weeks. This method has the advantage of leaving no scar on the side of the nose, but the success rate is lower than with the external DCR at approximately 70%. The main complications after surgery are bleeding and infection. The tube or stent may become displaced. You may experience some bruising around the area of the operation. A nosebleed may occur on the affected side. Usually this is a small amount and resolves within 48 hours. After the operation, you will be given antibiotic drops and possibly antibiotic tablets. It is important not to blow you nose or take flights for the first week after surgery. If you have a headache, regular painkiller tablets are recommended. Avoid exercise, swimming or eye make-up for 2 weeks after surgery.