Uveite

Uveite


Uveitis is an inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, called the uvea or uveal tract. It can cause eye pain and changes to your vision. Uveitis is rare, affecting around 2-5 people in every 10,000 each year normally in the age range of 20-59 but can also effect children. The type of uveitis is dependent on which part of the eye is affected. At the front of the eye, it can cause redness and pain and tends to come on quickly. At the middle of the eye, it can cause floaters and blurred vision. At the back of the eye, it can cause vision problems. Although extremely rare, Uveitis can affect both the front and the back of the eye and is known as pan-uveitis Uveitis at the front of the eye, known as Anterior Uveitis, is the most common type and accounts for around 90% of all cases. Symptoms for Uveitis include: redness of the eye, blurred vision, photophobia and headaches. During your examination, your Doctor will look for inflammatory cells in the anterior chamber and flare which occurs because of increased proteins leaking into the eye. A number of complications can occur in untreated uveitis. These include keratic precipitates, where inflammatory cells stick to the back of the cornea. Irregular pupil shape, which occurs when the inflamed iris 'sticks' to the crystalline lens. Hypopyon, which occurs when white blood cells settle at the bottom of the iris and usually clears following treatment. If Hypopyon is present for a prolonged period, there may also be an increase in eye pressure. It is vital that diagnosis and treatment commence as soon as possible. Treatment typically involves steroid drops and drops that dilate the pupil. It is important to gradually taper the dose of steroid drops as directed by your Ophthalmologist. The causes of Anterior Uveitis can be associated with many medical conditions, however in most cases, Uveitis occurs in isolation.