Cataratta Secondaria

Cataratta Secondaria


Cataract surgery involves the removal of the cloudy crystalline lens with an artificial lens, or IOL. The IOL is placed into a thin capsule that originally held the cataract. Occasionally, patients may experience cloudiness a few months or years after cataract surgery. The cloudiness occurs because of a growth of a thin membrane between the capsule and the IOL. This often causes symptoms blurred vision, light sensitivity and haloes. Treatment involves a laser procedure performed in an outpatient clinic. Drops will be used to dilate your pupil and then numb your eye - no injections or needles are used. A special contact lens may be placed on your eye to help focus the laser accurately and keep you from blinking. With each pulse, the laser creates an opening in the centre of the cloudy capsule. The opening restores the passage of light rays to the back of the eye. The actual procedure only takes a few minutes and the results are almost immediate. Extremely rarely, some patients can get a build-up of fliud in the macula - the part of the eye responsible for detailed central vision. This build-up of fluid is called macular oedema, which causes blurring or distortion of vision. Another extremely rare complication is a retinal detachment. If you notice sudden onset of flashing lights or a veil over you vision, contact your Ophthalmologist immediately. Finally, make sure you have made suitable transport arrangements as you will not be able to drive after the treatment.